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Nintendo 3DS

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Nintendo 3DS
Nintendo-3DS-AquaOpen
Manufacturer Nintendo
Type Handheld video game console
Generation Eighth generation
First available Flag of Japan February 26, 2011
European flag March 25, 2011
Flag of the United States/Flag of Canada March 27, 2011
Flag of Australia March 31, 2011
CPU 128 MB FCRAM
GPU Digital Media Professionals PICA200 GPU[1][2]
Media Nintendo 3DS, Nintendo DSi, and Nintendo DS game cards
System storage Cartridge save, 4 MB tRAM
2 GB NAND flash memory
SD card
Connectivity 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi IR
Online service Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection
Units shipped Worldwide: 31.09 million (as of March 31, 2013)[3]
Top-selling game Super Mario 3D Land, (8 million units)[4]
Backward compatibility Nintendo DS, Nintendo DSi
Predecessor Nintendo DSi XL

The Nintendo 3DS (ニンテンドー3DS Nintendō Surī Dī Esu?) is the new, refined successor of the Nintendo DS, released in February and March 2011. It has the option to play its native titles in normal 2-D and in a glassesless 3-D mode. It is also backwards compatible with most DS and DSiWare titles.

OverviewEdit

A stereoscopic version of Metroid appeared as an "interactive but nonplayable demo" called Classic Games, among 16 other "remakes" for the 3DS at E3 2010.[5] A second demo showed various 3D models of Nintendo characters with a real-time camera controlled by the new Slide Pad, including Samus Aran as she is seen in Metroid: Other M. [6][7] It was later revealed that these are puzzle pieces that can be unlocked to create a picture of the character, and it is possible to look at them in 3-D and pan around them.[8] Dead or Alive: Dimensions features the Geothermal Power Plant from Metroid: Other M, made into an arena with Ridley serving as a stage hazard. Samus also makes an appearance using the Morph Ball and Power Bomb, but, while making an appearance, is confirmed not to be a playable character.

It also supports 3-D movies, such as How to Train Your Dragon, Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga'Hoole, and Tangled.

In addition to the Nintendo 3DS software, it is backwards compatible with most DS and DSiWare titles, such as Metroid Prime Hunters, Metroid Prime Hunters: First Hunt and Metroid Prime Pinball — but like the Nintendo DSi, it is incompatible with DS software that requires the use of the Game Boy Advance port. Nintendo DS and DSi software cannot be played with 3D visuals on the 3DS. The original DS resolutions are displayed in a scaled and stretched fashion because the resolutions of the 3DS screens are larger than those of the DS. However, if the user holds down the Start or Select buttons upon launching the DS software, the displays will be at the DS's native resolution, albeit smaller with black borders.[9]

There is no confirmed new Metroid game to be released for the 3DS as of now. However, releases of older Metroid games have been released for the consoles Virtual Console service.

Nintendo eShopEdit

Virtual ConsoleEdit

AR cards

AR Cards to take pictures of posed characters with 3D camera. Includes sound effects for each respective character.

On June 6, 2011, Nintendo launched the Virtual Console service for the Nintendo 3DS on its Nintendo eShop. Similar to the Wii's Virtual Console service, it currently offers games from the Game Boy. One of its games is Metroid II: Return of Samus, currently available for all regions.

3DS Ambassador ProgramEdit

Because the 3DS has lowered its price, Nintendo has rewarded consumers that have already purchased the 3DS for $250 with the Ambassador program, which provided 20 free games for download to those who had used the eShop before August 12. On September 1, ten free NES games were given to the Ambassadors. One of one of them was the original Metroid. Considering the 25th anniversary this year, Metroid Fusion was made exclusively available to the Ambassadors in 2011, along with nine other free GBA games. While the NES games were released for sale to the general public at a later time (Ambassadors can receive the updated versions for free), the GBA games have only been made available to the Ambassadors.

GamesEdit

Metroid cameos on the Nintendo 3DSEdit

  • AR Games: Argumented Reality
  • StreetPass Mii Plaza
  • Nintendogs + Cats
  • Dead or Alive: Dimensions
  • Pushmo (NTSC) / Pullblox (PAL)
  • Kid Icarus: Uprising
  • Dynasty Warriors Vs.
  • Animal Crossing: New Leaf
  • Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS

Metroid games playable on the Nintendo DS backwards compatibilityEdit

Metroid games through eShopEdit

Metroid cameos on the Nintendo DS backwards compatibilityEdit

  • WarioWare: Touched!
  • Animal Crossing: Wild World
  • Tetris DS
  • Kirby Super Star Ultra
  • Phantasy Star Ø
  • WarioWare D.I.Y.
  • Picross DS
  • Jam with the Band

Metroid cameos through eShopEdit

  • 3D Classics: Kid Icarus
  • Kid Icarus: Of Myths and Monsters
  • Wario Land II (Japan only)
  • WarioWare, Inc.: Mega Microgame$! (Ambassadors only)

GalleryEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Yam, Marcus (June 22, 2010). DMP's Pica200 GPU is Behind Nintendo 3DS. Tom's Guide.
  2. ^ Ishaan (June 21, 2010). This Is What's Powering The 3DS' Graphics. Siliconera. Retrieved on 2010-08-05. “And so, we finally know who's providing the graphics chip for the Nintendo 3DS.”
  3. ^ Consolidated Sales Transition by Region (PDF). Nintendo (2013-04-24). Retrieved on 2013-04-24.
  4. ^ Nintendo Top Selling Software Sales Units. Nintendo (2012-04-26). Retrieved on 2012-04-26.
  5. ^ http://ds.ign.com/articles/109/1098405p1.html
  6. ^ http://gonintendo.com/viewstory.php?id=127168
  7. ^ http://www.stageselect.com/N5010-nintendo-3ds-hands-on-video.aspx
  8. ^ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O2UTJ5rIeeA
  9. ^ Nintendo 3DS Operations Manual (US) (PDF). Retrieved on 2011-11-01.
  10. ^ Turnbull, David (25 Feb 2011). Samus, Link, Kirby and Pikmin in Augmented Reality for Nintendo 3DS. Retrieved on 2012-01-05.


Further ReadingEdit

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