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This article is written from the Real Life point of view Globe


Steve Barcia is a video game programmer, producer and entrepreneur. He founded Simtex Studios Inc. in 1988, which released several turn-based strategy games for the PC, including the first two Master of Orion games. Following Simtex's closing in 1997, Barcia succeeded Jeff Spangenberg as the president of Retro Studios after a takeover by Nintendo of America.[1] Barcia went on to become the executive producer of Metroid Prime, the quality of which was largely credited to Barcia's involvement. The cancelled Retro game Raven Blade was said to be Barcia's "baby"[2]; this game was dropped due to its lagging in development and to free up resources for Prime. Barcia had no further involvement with the Prime series and following an owner's meeting in April 2003, was replaced by Michael Kelbaugh. Barcia has since joined EA Canada in Vancouver, and oversees the production of the Def Jam games.[3]

Former employees of Retro Studios have described Barcia as having "mandated a back-breaking work ethic", with working conditions declining under his tenure, including unpaid and excessive overtime, and pay disparities. Despite this, they stated that he was intelligent and genuinely cares about the end product. One anonymous employee said that they worked 48 hours straight on Prime without sleeping, and overtime of at least 12 hours a day for nine to ten months. A mass exodus of employees was planned until Barcia was replaced. Under Michael Kelbaugh, the working environment and stability at Retro improved.[4]

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ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ http://www.n-sider.com/personnelview.php?personnelid=1292
  2. ^ http://www.n-sider.com/personnelview.php?personnelid=1292
  3. ^ http://www.n-sider.com/contentview.php?contentid=267&page=8
  4. ^ Blake Hester. "The rocky story of Retro Studios before Metroid Prime", Polygon, May 29, 2018. Retrieved on May 31, 2018. (in English) “"It was probably one of the worst experiences I’ve ever had. We had a rough time with development in general. But we had an enforced almost year's worth of overtime. I think it was nine to 10 months of over time of at least minimum 12-hour days. I worked 48 hours straight on that project without sleeping. It was the worst."”